News

Canadians might soon see Parliament shooter's video

Andrew McIntosh, QMI Agency

Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, pictured in this image tweeted from an ISIS social media account, has been identified as the shooter of a soldier standing guard at the National War Memorial in Ottawa, Oct. 22, 2014. (Twitter/Handout/QMI Agency)

Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, pictured in this image tweeted from an ISIS social media account, has been identified as the shooter of a soldier standing guard at the National War Memorial in Ottawa, Oct. 22, 2014. (Twitter/Handout/QMI Agency)

Canadians might soon see the mysterious video recorded by the gunman who killed a soldier at the National War Memorial before storming Parliament, QMI Agency has learned.

Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, 32, recorded the video to explain his motives for his rampage on Oct. 22.

The RCMP has kept the manifesto secret until now.

But during a closed session Tuesday, the Commons public safety and national security committee voted to invite RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson to screen the video publicly "at his convenience and as soon as possible."

The motion emphasized the independence of the commissioner, who will decide whether to accept the invitation.

Zehaf-Bibeau shot and killed unarmed Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, 24, across the street from Parliament Hill before storming the parliamentary precinct and opening fire. Security agents gunned him down.

The RCMP seized the shooter's video as part of its criminal investigation and Paulson said at the time it would eventually be broadcast.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper then described Zehaf-Bibeau's actions as "terrorist" acts.

Paulson changed his tune following Harper's statement, saying the Mounties weren't sure if Canadians would see the video.

QMI Agency requested the video under an Access to Information application, which the RCMP denied. The Mounties said releasing the video could undermine a criminal investigation. QMI has appealed the decision to the federal information commissioner.